PETERHEAD CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH Cross
94 Queen Street, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Minister - Rev Dr James McMillan


As a church we owe much to our forefathers who have given us such a beautiful building to worship in. But where did the Congregational Church in Peterhead come from? In 1801 a group of people left the Muckle Kirk. They were concerned about decisions that were being made by the General Assembly, decisions that they had no influence over. Because of this they left and began regular weekly meetings in the hall in Society Close.

Once a month the Congregational Minister from Stuartfield would come and see to the Worship. In due time they moved their meetings to a room in the Masonic Hall building, where they continued to meet for about 20 years.

The people wanted a church building and in 1822 the opportunity came. In 1794 the Anti-Burgher congregation built the North Church of Peterhead in Windmill Street. By 1822 the congregation was almost non-existent and so the church was put up for sale. It was purchased by the Congregational Meeting and, in 1823, the church was founded, calling its first minister in 1824. Over the coming years the congregation grew and there was a need to seek a larger building, so it was decided to buy a piece of ground and have a new church built.

In 1869 the church employed James Matthew (1819-1898) as their architect. Matthew had built and designed other churches and houses in Aberdeenshire and, in 1870, the new church was opened on Queen Street with a seating capacity of 450. Nothing was spared in the building of the church, only the best of materials were used, and this can be seen today as many of the original features remain intact.

Isn't it marvellous to think that, more than 145 years after it was built, we are still able to worship God in this fine church - built to the glory of God by people who loved the Lord.

Ā© 2017 Peterhead Congregational Church,
Scottish Charity No.SC040453

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